@datastax/astra-db-ts

@datastax/astra-db-ts

astra-db-ts is a TypeScript client for interacting with DataStax Astra DB.

This README targets v1.0.0+, which introduces a whole new API. Click here for the pre-existing client readme.

Table of contents

Quickstart

Use your preferred package manager to install @datastax/astra-db-ts. Note that this is not supported in browsers.

Get the API endpoint and your application token for your Astra DB instance @ astra.datastax.com.

Try the following code after setting the following environment variables:

import { DataAPIClient, VectorDoc, UUID, ObjectId } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

// Schema for the collection (VectorDoc adds the $vector field)
interface Idea extends VectorDoc {
idea: string,
}

// Connect to the db
const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*');
const db = client.db('*ENDPOINT*', { namespace: '*NAMESPACE*' });

(async () => {
try {
// Creates collection, or gets it if it already exists with same options
const collection = await db.createCollection<Idea>('vector_5_collection', {
vector: {
dimension: 5,
metric: 'cosine'
},
checkExists: false,
});

// Insert many ideas into the collection
const ideas = [
{
idea: 'An AI quilt to help you sleep forever',
$vector: [0.1, 0.15, 0.3, 0.12, 0.05],
},
{
_id: new UUID('e7f1f3a0-7e3d-11eb-9439-0242ac130002'),
idea: 'Vision Vector Frame—A deep learning display that controls your mood',
$vector: [0.1, 0.05, 0.08, 0.3, 0.6],
},
{
idea: 'A smartwatch that tells you what to eat based on your mood',
$vector: [0.2, 0.3, 0.1, 0.4, 0.15],
},
];
await collection.insertMany(ideas);

// Insert a specific idea into the collection
const sneakersIdea = {
_id: new ObjectId('507f191e810c19729de860ea'),
idea: 'ChatGPT-integrated sneakers that talk to you',
$vector: [0.45, 0.09, 0.01, 0.2, 0.11],
}
await collection.insertOne(sneakersIdea);

// Actually, let's change that idea
await collection.updateOne(
{ _id: sneakersIdea._id },
{ $set: { idea: 'Gemini-integrated sneakers that talk to you' } },
);

// Get similar results as desired
const cursor = collection.find({}, {
vector: [0.1, 0.15, 0.3, 0.12, 0.05],
includeSimilarity: true,
limit: 2,
});

for await (const doc of cursor) {
// Prints the following:
// - An AI quilt to help you sleep forever: 1
// - A smartwatch that tells you what to eat based on your mood: 0.85490346
console.log(`${doc.idea}: ${doc.$similarity}`);
}

// Cleanup (if desired)
await collection.drop();
} finally {
// Cleans up all open http sessions
await client.close();
}
})();

Next steps:

High-level architecture

astra-db-ts's abstractions for working at the data and admin layers are structured as depicted by this diagram:

Class hierarchy diagram

Here's a small admin-oriented example:

import { DataAPIClient } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

// Spawn an admin
const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*');
const admin = client.admin();

(async () => {
// list info about all databases
const databases = await admin.listDatabases();
const dbInfo = databases[0];
console.log(dbInfo.info.name, dbInfo.id, dbInfo.info.region);

// list namespaces for the first database
const dbAdmin = admin.dbAdmin(dbInfo.id, dbInfo.info.region);
console.log(await dbAdmin.listNamespaces());
})();

Getting the most out of the typing

astra-db-ts is a typescript-first library, performing minimal runtime type-checking. As such, it provides a rich set of types to help you write type-safe code.

Here are some examples of how you can properly leverage types to make your code more robust:

// First of all:
// I *highly* recommend writing your query objects & filter objects and such inline with the methods
// to get the best possible type-checking and autocomplete

import { DataAPIClient, StrictFilter, StrictSort, UUID } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*');
const db = client.db('*ENDPOINT*', { namespace: '*NAMESPACE*' });

// You can strictly type your collections for proper type-checking
interface Person {
_id: UUID,
name: string,
interests: {
favoriteBand?: string,
friend?: UUID,
}
}

(async () => {
// Create your collections with a defaultId type to enforce the type of the _id field
// (Otherwise it'll default to a string UUID that wouldn't be deserialized as a UUID by the client)
const collection = await db.createCollection<Person>('my_collection', { defaultId: { type: 'uuidv7' } });

// Now it'll raise type-errors if you try to insert a document with the wrong shape
await collection.insertOne({
_id: new UUID('e7f1f3a0-7e3d-11eb-9439-0242ac130002'),
name: 'John',
interests: {
favoriteBand: 'Nightwish',
},
// @ts-expect-error - 'eyeColor' does not exist in type MaybeId<Person>
eyeColor: 'blue',
});

// You can use the 'Strict*' version of Sort/Projection/Filter/UpdateFilter for proper type-checking and autocomplete
await collection.findOne({
// @ts-expect-error - Type number is not assignable to type FilterExpr<UUID | undefined>
'interests.friend': 3,
} satisfies StrictFilter<Person>, {
sort: {
name: 1,
// @ts-expect-error - 'interests.favoriteColor' does not exist in type StrictProjection<Person>
'interests.favoriteColor': 1 as const,
} satisfies StrictSort<Person>,
});
})();

Working with Dates

Native JS Date objects can be used anywhere in documents to represent dates and times.

Document fields stored using the { $date: number } will also be returned as Date objects when read.

import { DataAPIClient } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

// Reference an untyped collection
const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*');
const db = client.db('*ENDPOINT*', { namespace: '*NAMESPACE*' });

(async () => {
const collection = await db.createCollection('dates_test');

// Insert documents with some dates
await collection.insertOne({ dateOfBirth: new Date(1394104654000) });
await collection.insertOne({ dateOfBirth: new Date('1863-05-28') });

// Update a document with a date and setting lastModified to now
await collection.updateOne(
{
dateOfBirth: new Date('1863-05-28'),
},
{
$set: { message: 'Happy Birthday!' },
$currentDate: { lastModified: true },
},
);

// Will print *around* `new Date()` (i.e. when server processed the request)
const found = await collection.findOne({ dateOfBirth: { $lt: new Date('1900-01-01') } });
console.log(found?.lastModified);

// Cleanup (if desired)
await collection.drop();
})();

Working with ObjectIds and UUIDs

astra-db-ts exports an ObjectId and UUID class for working with these types in the database.

Note that these are custom classes, and not the ones from the bson package. Make sure you're using the right one!

import { DataAPIClient, ObjectId, UUID } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

interface Person {
_id: ObjectId | UUID,
name: string,
friendId?: ObjectId | UUID,
}

// Connect to the db
const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*');
const db = client.db('*ENDPOINT*', { namespace: '*NAMESPACE*' });

(async () => {
// Create a collection with a UUIDv7 as the default ID
const collection = await db.createCollection<Person>('ids_test', { defaultId: { type: 'uuidv7' } });

// You can manually set whatever ID you want
await collection.insertOne({ _id: new ObjectId("65fd9b52d7fabba03349d013"), name: 'John' });

// Or use the default ID
await collection.insertOne({ name: 'Jane' });

// Let's give Jane a friend with a UUIDv4
const friendId = UUID.v4();

await collection.insertOne({ name: 'Alice', _id: friendId });

await collection.updateOne(
{ name: 'Jane' },
{ $set: { friendId } },
);

// And let's get Jane as a document
// (Prints "Jane", the generated UUIDv4, and true)
const jane = await collection.findOne({ name: 'Jane' });
console.log(jane?.name, jane?.friendId?.toString(), friendId.equals(jane?.friendId));

// Cleanup (if desired)
await collection.drop();
})();

Monitoring/logging

Like Mongo, astra-db-ts doesn't provide a traditional logging system—instead, it uses a "monitoring" system based on event emitters, which allow you to listen to events and log them as you see fit.

Supported events include commandStarted, commandSucceeded, commandFailed, and adminCommandStarted, adminCommandPolling, adminCommandSucceeded, adminCommandFailed.

Note that it's disabled by default, and it can be enabled by passing monitorCommands: true option to the root options' dbOptions and adminOptions.

import { DataAPIClient } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*', {
dbOptions: {
monitorCommands: true,
},
});
const db = client.db('*ENDPOINT*');

client.on('commandStarted', (event) => {
console.log(`Running command ${event.commandName}`);
});

client.on('commandSucceeded', (event) => {
console.log(`Command ${event.commandName} succeeded in ${event.duration}ms`);
});

client.on('commandFailed', (event) => {
console.error(`Command ${event.commandName} failed w/ error ${event.error}`);
});

(async () => {
// Should log
// - "Running command createCollection"
// - "Command createCollection succeeded in <time>ms"
const collection = await db.createCollection('my_collection', { checkExists: false });

// Should log
// - "Running command insertOne"
// - "Command insertOne succeeded in <time>ms"
await collection.insertOne({ name: 'Queen' });

// Remove all monitoring listeners
client.removeAllListeners();

// Cleanup (if desired) (with no logging)
await collection.drop();
})();

Non-standard runtime support

astra-db-ts is designed foremost to work in Node.js environments, and it's not supported in browsers. It will work in edge runtimes and other non-node environments as well, though it'll use the native fetch API for HTTP requests, as opposed to fetch-h2 which provides extended HTTP/2 and HTTP/1.1 support for performance.

On Node (exactly node; not Bun or Deno with node compat on) environments, it'll use fetch-h2 by default; on others, it'll use fetch. You can explicitly set the fetch implementation when instantiating the client:

import { DataAPIClient } from '@datastax/astra-db-ts';

const client = new DataAPIClient('*TOKEN*', {
httpOptions: {
client: 'fetch', // or 'default' for fetch-h2
},
});

Note that setting the httpOptions implicitly sets the fetch implementation to default (fetch-h2), so you'll need to set it explicitly if you want to use the native fetch implementation.

On some environments, such as Cloudflare Workers, you may additionally need to use the events polyfill for the client to work properly (i.e. npm i events). Cloudflare's node-compat won't work here.

Check out the examples/ subdirectory for some non-standard runtime examples with more info.